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brief history of the company

Some 20 years ago I fell in love with bamboo.

I decided to learn to build some of the best bamboo fly rods that ever unfolded a fly line over weary trout. At that time, I did not realize, what a task I had set myself, and that this was only the beginning of a lifelong learning process.

I started learning the basics of rod building by experimenting with different techniques to find those giving me the best results as well as suiting me best.

Having obtained the basic skills needed to build a structurally sound rod, I started to study rod design, experimenting with all kinds of stress curves to learn the effect of changes in the stress curves and the resulting rod actions.  From the beginning I decided not to copy any rods whatsoever, and besides building a Garrison's 209E I only built my own tapers.

I wanted to find my own way, my own style and not copy other maker's work. Of course I did get inspiration by casting and fishing the rods of other makers, but instead of taking measurements of the rod's taper and then building copies, I tried to design an action to give the same feeling as the one that impressed me. This method is of course very time consuming, especially in the beginning, but during the years, this method has given me a good understanding of rod design, and the past few years I have felt at ease with all kinds of different rod actions for rods up to 9'.

Although my intention from the beginning was to be able to build some excellent rods for my own fishing (good bamboo rods are expensive, especially for a poor student), I got so involved in this process that I stopped my studies of classical music and became a student of the bamboo fly rod instead.

The word spread that there was a guy building some nice fly rods and in the beginning of the  1980s  I had enough orders to start as a full time professional. My income in the beginning was just enough to survive, but at that time I did not care. I was obsessed with rod building and rod design and with testing the results of my efforts.

This started the period I call: My years of bamboo talk.

The more I learned about bamboo, the more I was impressed by this fantastic material, and during the many hours in my workshop, bamboo and I started to talk together in a kind of telepathic way. I told the bamboo about what I wished it to do and why, bamboo told me what it was capable of, what it liked and what it disliked.

In the beginning this conversation was considerable, -I had so much to learn!

But as years went by the relationship between bamboo and me became more like that of an old, married couple: a little smile, a wrinkling of the eyebrows is all it takes and the other part understands.

Now, having built more than 700 rods and being 50 years of age, I consider myself a mature master of the craft.